Attention Deficit Disorder and Therapeutic Riding

Attention Deficit Disorder and Therapeutic Riding
Reprinted from NARHA Strides magazine, October 1997 (Vol. 3, No. 3).

Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD) is a developmental disability estimated to affect between 3-5% of all children (Barkley, 1990). The disorder is characterized by three predominant features: inattentiveness, impulsivity, and in many but not all cases, restlessness or hyperactivity. The disorder is most prevalent in children and is generally thought of as a childhood disorder. Recent studies, however, show that ADD can and does continue throughout the adult years. Estimates suggest that approximately 50-65% of the children with ADD will have symptoms of the disorder as adolescents and adults (Barkley, 1990).

Medical Considerations for Therapeutic Riding
Reprinted from NARHA Strides magazine, October 1997 (Vol. 3, No. 3)

Many parents of riders enrolled in a therapeutic riding program marvel at their child’s newfound skills. The riding center may be one of the first places where their child experiences success and acceptance. The motivating lure of the large, gentle animal, the calm and consistent support of the therapeutic riding team, and the naturally accepting environment of the “stable” provide opportunities for the child to learn and develop. These opportunities may help to turn the often disparaging label of ADD into a child who is Absolutely Delightfully Driven.