Brain Injuries and Therapeutic Riding

Brain Injuries and Therapeutic Riding

Reprinted from NARHA Strides magazine, April 1996 (Vol. 2, No. 2)

Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is defined as an insult to the brain caused by an external physical force that may produce a diminished or altered state of consciousness. This results in an impairment of cognitive abilities and/or physical functioning. The term TBI does not apply to brain injuries that are congenital or degenerative, or brain injuries induced by birth trauma.

Medical Considerations for Therapeutic Riding

Reprinted from NARHA Strides magazine, April 1996 (Vol. 2, No. 2)

This is a unique problems faced by the person post-TBI, not the diagnosis itself, which may be improved through the use of the horse. In spite of their balance, movement, posture, communication and behavioral problems, horses can provide a strong motivating, consistent, multisensory input that appears to help the rider’s brain organize itself. Gradual recovery from TBI can continue for years, making therapeutic riding a source of stimulation to continue that recovery over a long period of time. A well-planned, carefully implemented riding program can not only facilitate the rider’s recovery from TBI, but also provide a much-needed source of pleasure, risk and self-esteem to a person who really needs it. The attraction of and bonding with the horse can be a positive and stabilizing experience in that person’s life; it also can be an activity in which the whole family can participate. Helping people with TBI to help themselves, through the unique qualities of the horse, is rewarding for everyone.